Coronavirus (Covid-19)

Advice for people with diabetes and their families

Our research projects

We fund world class research

At any one time, we have around 120 research projects making discoveries across the UK. Each of these projects is only possible thanks to the generous support of our members, donors and local groups

Every project is reviewed by experts and approved by our research committee and our panel of people living with diabetes. So you're supporting research of the highest scientific quality, led by researchers with the skills and experience to succeed.

Your support of our research projects means we can keep tackling the complications of diabetes and bring us one step closer to a cure.

Find a research project

Use the search tool to discover research taking place in your local area, or choose a subject or type of diabetes you’re interested in.

Each project page showcases the details of the research, and if you find a research project you could really get behind, you can support it in lots of different ways.

117 results found

Filters
Research Area
Region
Subject

Protecting the blood vessels in diabetes

Project:
South West - Bristol
Status:
Project available for adoption
Tags:
Type 1 and Type 2
England - South West
South West
Complications
Project Summary

Blood vessels are lined with endothelial cells, which have a protective coating. This coating can become damaged in diabetes, leading to the development of complications like stroke, heart attack and kidney disease. Dr Satchell will study the coating in more detail to see if it can be used as a treatment to protect blood vessels in people with diabetes.

Stopping thymic B cells in Type 1 diabetes

Project:
Northern & Yorkshire - York
Status:
Project available for adoption
Tags:
Type 1
Causes
England - Northern & Yorkshire
Northern & Yorkshire
Project Summary

The thymus helps to destroy ‘bad’ immune cells that attack the body, but this doesn’t happen in people with Type 1 diabetes. Dr Allison Green will find out why and how the thymus stops working properly in people with Type 1 diabetes, which could lead to treatments to prevent the condition.

Helping the immune system tackle Type 1 diabetes

Project:
London
Status:
Project available for adoption
Tags:
Type 1
England - London
London
Towards a cure
Prevention
Project Summary

Immune cells called Tregs police the immune system and stop it from attacking healthy cells. But in Type 1 diabetes, this goes wrong. Professor Federica Marelli-Berg has found a drug that helps Tregs work better. She’ll test this drug to see if it can prevent or slow the progression of Type 1 diabetes. In the future, this could lead to life-changing new treatments for people with or at risk of the condition.

Banking on retinopathy research

Project:
London
Status:
Project not available for adoption
Tags:
England - London
Complications
Type 1 and Type 2
London
Project Summary

Professor Marcus Fruttiger and his team will collect and study eyes donated by people with diabetic retinopathy after their death. This will help to improve our understanding of what leads to retinopathy and lay the foundation for a retinopathy tissue bank that will, in the long run, become a valuable resource for research in this area.

Unlocking new treatments for diabetic eye disease

Project:
London
Status:
Project available for adoption
Tags:
Complications
Type 1 and Type 2
England - London
London
Project Summary

Professor Stephen Moss has found a protein involved in retinopathy. He now wants to understand precisely how it causes damage to blood vessels in the eye and test whether blocking its activity could help to prevent retinopathy in mice. This research could help us to understand how people with diabetes develop eye damage and find new, better treatments to stop it.

Breaking down blood clots to tackle complications

Project:
Leeds
Status:
Project available for adoption
Tags:
Type 1 and Type 2
Complications
Northern & Yorkshire
England - Northern & Yorkshire
Project Summary

Blood clots are a key cause of heart attacks and strokes and are often more difficult to break down in people with diabetes. Dr Ramzi Ajjan will use state-of-the-art techniques to identify small proteins that could help to break clots down, and then test out their effects. This research could lead to new treatments that protect people with diabetes from life-threatening complications.

Unravelling DNA structures and diabetes risk

Project:
South East
Status:
Project available for adoption
Tags:
England - Eastern
Eastern
Type 1 and Type 2
Causes
Project Summary

Our genes can put us at greater risk of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Dr Zoe Waller has found molecules in a specific region of our DNA that control whether genes involved in producing insulin are switched on or off. She now wants to understand how and why they do this. This could improve our understanding of the genetics behind diabetes and lead to new treatments to treat the conditions.

Helping people with foot ulcers to exercise

Project:
Midlands - Leicester
Status:
Project available for adoption
Tags:
Type 1 and Type 2
Type 1
Type 2
Complications
Midlands
England
Project Summary

Treating foot ulcers involves resting, but this can mean long periods of inactivity. Dr McCarthy has developed an exercise programme designed for people with foot ulcers who need to sit down. He hopes this will help to improve their blood sugar levels, quality of life and overall fitness. Too little exercise can make diabetes more difficult to manage, so an exercise programme at this time could be crucial. This project will also provide evidence for doctors, to help them support patients to stay active whilst keeping off their feet.

How does the heart’s energy change in Type 2 diabetes?

Project:
Northern and Yorkshire
Status:
Project available for adoption
Tags:
Healthcare
Northern & Yorkshire
Type 2
Project Summary

Having Type 2 diabetes changes the way the heart generates the energy it needs to pump blood. Professor Sven Plein wants to know more about these changes, specifically in people who have narrow arteries – a common complication of Type 2 diabetes. Understanding the interaction between Type 2 diabetes and narrow arteries will help with the discovery of new, tailored treatments for people with Type 2 diabetes in the future.

Investigating the ins and outs of insulin

Project:
Scotland
Status:
Project available for adoption
Tags:
Causes
Scotland
Type 2
Project Summary

Insulin helps fat and muscle cells to take in glucose from the bloodstream, so they can use it for fuel. Professor Gwyn Gould wants to understand, on a molecular level, exactly how this process works and how it goes wrong in people with Type 2 diabetes. This knowledge will help lead the way to new future treatments that prevent this from happening.

Brand Icons/Telephone check - FontAwesome icons/tick icons/uk