Coronavirus (Covid-19)

Advice for people with diabetes and their families

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Diabetes hits almost 600,000 in London

New analysis shows that the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in London is 599,699 – 6.7% of the population.

The highest rate in London is in Harrow at 9.9% and the lowest in Hammersmith and Fulham with 3.6%.

We released this new analysis to mark Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Week, which focused on raising awareness of the risk factors that contribute to developing type 2 diabetes, plus the steps people can take to reduce this risk.

Type 2 diabetes is a complex condition with multiple risk factors. There are things outside an individual’s control that contribute to their risk, such as age, family history and ethnicity. People of African-Caribbean, Black African or South Asian descent are two to four times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those from a white background.

However, our society, and our environment, both also outside the control of the individual, can also impact on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In a society that makes it more difficult to lead healthy lives, it is more likely that more people will be living with overweight or obesity.

Research shows that living with obesity is the single greatest risk factor, and accounts for 80-85% of someone's risk of developing the condition.

But by understanding their own personal risk, it is possible for people to access support to help them take steps to reduce their risk. Diabetes UK is therefore encouraging everyone to complete Diabetes UK’s free online Know Your Risk tool, today.

Once completed, the risk tool advises the individual on their risk and suggests next steps. In England, for those who are advised to be at moderate or high risk, they can directly sign up to the Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NHS DPP).

Roz Rosenblatt, Regional spokesperson at Diabetes UK, said: 

“The number of people with diabetes is increasing year-on-year. As we look to the future post COVID-19, preventing cases of type 2 diabetes must be a public health priority.

The pandemic has sadly shown us how diabetes puts you at increased risk of poorer outcomes when catching the virus. Yet we know that with the right support, up to half of type 2 diabetes cases − and the accompanying risk of developing life-threatening complications − can be delayed or prevented.”

Note: In 2020, some CCGs merged. This means that year on year comparison between CCGs is difficult, and it may mean result in some CCGs appearing better or worse than previous years.

Highest rates of diabetes in CCGs across England

CCG code

CCG name

Prevalence (%)

08E

NHS Harrow CCG

9.99

05L

NHS Sandwell and West Birmingham CCG

9.58

04C

NHS Leicester City CCG

9.36

05Y

NHS Walsall CCG

9.33

07P

NHS Brent CCG

9.27

03J

NHS North Kirklees CCG

9.26

08N

NHS Redbridge CCG

9.06

07W

NHS Ealing CCG

8.95

36J

NHS Bradford District and Craven CCG

8.91

00Q

NHS Blackburn With Darwen CCG

8.85

 

Lowest rates of diabetes in CCGs across England

CCG code

CCG name

Register

Prevalence (%)

08C

NHS Hammersmith and Fulham CCG

9,692

3.62

09A

NHS Central London (Westminster) CCG

8,419

4.02

09D

NHS Brighton and Hove CCG

11,660

4.22

08Y

NHS West London CCG

10,928

4.92

10Q

NHS Oxfordshire CCG

31,982

5.05

15A

NHS Berkshire West CCG

24,540

5.52

03Q

NHS Vale of York CCG

16,979

5.59

36L

NHS South West London CCG

77,935

5.66

92A

NHS Surrey Heartlands CCG

50,909

5.77

10X

NHS Southampton CCG

14,213

5.92

 

 

 

 

 

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