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One in five people admitted to hospital for angina, stroke, heart attack or heart failure have diabetes

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One in five people admitted to hospital for angina, stroke, heart attack or heart failure have diabetes, according to a new report published today.

The National Diabetes Audit report, published today by the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC), reveals that there were 23,986 "excess" deaths in people with diabetes in England and Wales in 2013. This means that they died earlier than would have been expected if compared to people without the condition.

Those with Type 1 diabetes were 131 per cent more likely to die in 2013 than their peers of their age without the condition and those with Type 2 diabetes were 32 per cent more likely to die.

The analysis showed that people with diabetes were:

  • 139 per cent more likely to be admitted to hospital with angina
  • 94 per cent more likely to be admitted to hospital with myocardial infarction
  • 126 per cent more likely to be admitted to hospital with heart failure
  • 63 per cent more likely to be admitted to hospital with a stroke
  • 400 per cent more likely to be admitted to hospital for a major amputation and 817 per cent more likely to be admitted with a minor amputation
  • 272 per cent more likely to be admitted to hospital for renal replacement therapy

Simon O'Neill, Director of Health Intelligence at Diabetes UK, said: "The finding that every fifth person admitted to hospital for angina, stroke, heart attack and heart failure has diabetes shows the extent of the burden of diabetes-related complications on our hospitals. Clearly, with the rising number of people with diabetes this is likely to have an effect on already-stretched A&E departments.

"But above all, these figures show that people with diabetes are developing serious complications at a high rate and dying before their time. While there are some encouraging findings with rates of most complications and early death falling, the report makes clear that we are only likely to see further improvements if we fill the gaping holes in the support people receive to manage their condition.

"In particular, we need to bring an end to the postcode lottery of diabetes care. People with diabetes should have a right to expect good quality healthcare wherever they live but this is not happening at the moment.

"This report highlights the need for better care, support and access to diabetes education. Unless this happens urgently, we will continue to see more people dying unnecessarily early."

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