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Your child, diabetes and school

Diabetes shouldn’t stop your child enjoying school, and having the same experiences as any other child. It’s important that schools and parents work together to make sure that children with diabetes are getting the care they need and deserve. 

Feeling anxious about your child starting or going back to school if they have diabetes is completely normal. It can be scary letting go and trusting other people to manage your child’s diabetes during the day, but we know that great care in schools exists because we’re seeing it happen.

We also know that a lot of families and schools need help to understand what diabetes means in a school environment, and that’s where we come in. 

Medical condition policies across the UK 

In the UK, different laws are in place to make sure your child gets exactly the same access to education and experiences as any other child without a medical condition. 

The different nations in the UK look after and make decisions about education policies locally. This means that there isn’t one policy, or piece of legislation, that covers all of the UK when it comes to looking after a child with a medical condition, including diabetes. 

We have more information on the different policies in different nations on our legal policies page and a quick guide on the parent responsibilities page.

Diabetes care in schools 

It doesn’t matter what nation you live in every school has a duty of care to look after your child while they’re at school.

If your child is starting school, moved schools or only recently been diagnosed with diabetes, we have our school’s information pack. We’ve designed this to help your school introduce school policies, learn about diabetes, and make sure they’re giving the best care possible.

Order our schools pack

Our good practice checklist

All schools should have these basic procedures in place to support students with a long-term medical condition, such as diabetes. 

  • A medical conditions policy
    Medical conditions policies are created by a school’s board of governors and should be review regularly. They cover what actions should be taken by the school to make sure your child diabetes is looked after, and that they are fully included in the day-to-day life of the school.
     
  • An Individual Health Care Plan
    Individual Health Care Plans, or IHPs, are called different things depending on the nation you live in. But these plans are used to make sure your child’s diabetes in managed properly during school time. You and your child’s PDSN should be there when your child’s personal plan is created. It should also be updated and reviewed regularly. 
     
  • Make sure you work together
    Everyone should be working together to make sure your child has the best experience at school. You should feel happy and confident that your communication with your school and diabetes team is constructive and regular. 
     
  • Training and support 
    At least two members of staff at your child’s school should be fully trained to support your child and their diabetes. It’s important that other members of staff have a general awareness training too, this training should be done by your PDSN although you can help with this too. 

Good Diabetes care in schools Award 

We created our Good Diabetes Care in Schools Award to congratulate schools who are committed to providing great care to children with diabetes. 

We celebrate schools that work with parents and healthcare professionals to make sure children with diabetes have an easy experience at school as possible. 

You can nominate your child’s school and tell them how much you appreciate their work and dedication to making your child’s time at school safe and enjoyable.  
 

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