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Dr Tabitha Randell

Tabitha Randell- 2018 Clinical Champion

Consultant in Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust 

As one of our Clinical Champions, Dr Randell wants to establish what young people would like to help them manage their diabetes.

Innovations such as ‘Skype-type’ clinics have been effective in small studies elsewhere but are they something that young people would like offering on a wider scale?  

She also hopes to find out exactly how effective local (and national) diabetes care is for the 16-25 age group from the NDA data and other local data to truly work out the size of the problem. As there is unlikely to be any increase in funding for diabetes services in young adults, exploring new ways of working is going to be the best way to try to improve outcomes.

Background

Dr Randell has been a Consultant in Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes for over 15 years, working at Nottingham University Hospitals since October 2005.

She helped set up the paediatric diabetes networks across England in 2009 and was the chair of the East Midlands Paediatric Diabetes Network from 2009-2015. In 2010 she was seconded to NHS Diabetes for one session a week to look at ways to try to improve the care of children and young people with diabetes, successfully negotiating the introduction of the paediatric diabetes Best Practice Tariff from 2012 onwards.

The paediatric diabetes service at Nottingham Children’s Hospital cares for over 330 children and young people with diabetes, over half of whom are on insulin pump therapy. For the past 4 years, Nottingham has been in the top 5 best performing trusts for paediatric diabetes outcomes across England and Wales.

With the huge improvements in local paediatric diabetes outcomes, the contrast with outcomes in young adults (16-25 year olds) has become ever starker, with local admission rates for diabetic ketoacidosis being five times those in under 16s and a number of these being repeat admissions for the same young people. Precise data for the 16-25 age group is also difficult to come by as the National Diabetes Audit (NDA) presents data on ‘under 40 year olds’ as a homogeneous group. 

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