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Diabetes inpatient and hospital care

Around 15 per cent of all hospital beds in the UK are occupied by people with diabetes. People with diabetes admitted to hospital must be cared for by appropriately trained staff, provided with access to a specialist diabetes team and given the choice of self monitoring and managing their own insulin.

Use the following resources and tools to improve inpatient and hospital care for people with diabetes.

Publications

Adapting the Ipswich Touch Test to increase foot risk assessments at the Royal Free Hospital, Diabetes UK (August 2016) (PDF, 363KB)

This bright idea describes how the Royal Free Hospital created a foot risk assessment tool based on the Ipswich Touch Test. Since introduction of the tool, the percentage of people with diabetes who received a foot risk assessment on admission increased from 6.5 per cent in 2013 to 40 per cent in 2015. Download thetoolfeatured in the bright idea (PDF, 42KB).

Essential reading

  • Joint British Diabetes Society for Inpatient Care, Diabetes UK website (2016)

    This resource provides evidence based guidelines to improve inpatient diabetes care that have been developed by the Joint British Diabetes Society for Inpatient Care (JDBS-IP). It also contains case studies and tools from the winners and runners up of the Rowan Hillson insulin safety awards.This resource provides evidence based guidelines to improve inpatient diabetes care that have been developed by the Joint British Diabetes Society for Inpatient Care (JDBS-IP). It also contains case studies and tools from the winners and runners up of the Rowan Hillson insulin safety awards.
  • Self administration of insulin in hospital: a guide to support Trusts through the implementation process, Wessex Academic Health Science Network website (January 2017)

    This guide supports Trusts through the process of setting up safe and robust arrangements for routine self administration of insulin. Part 1 helps Trust to make a case for change and Part 2 provides step by step guidance on how to implement and measure self administration of insulin throughout a hospital. This guide supports Trusts through the process of setting up safe and robust arrangements for routine self administration of insulin. Part 1 helps Trust to make a case for change and Part 2 provides step by step guidance on how to implement and measure self administration of insulin throughout a hospital. 

Shared practice examples

  • Abbreviated JBDS-IP DKA management guideline

    Dr Parijat De, Consultant in diabetes and endocrinology and Diabetes UK Clinical Champion, piloted a condensed and abbreviated version of the original DKA management and monitoring chart developed by the JBDS-IP committee, at the Sandwell and West Birmingham NHS Trust. This can be downloaded and used in hospitals where the original full length DKA document is not being consistently used by junior doctors or if there are specific implementation issues. For further questions email clinical.champions@diabetes.org.uk. Dr Parijat De, Consultant in diabetes and endocrinology and Diabetes UK Clinical Champion, piloted a condensed and abbreviated version of the original DKA management and monitoring chart developed by the JBDS-IP committee, at the Sandwell and West Birmingham NHS Trust. This can be downloaded and used in hospitals where the original full length DKA document is not being consistently used by junior doctors or if there are specific implementation issues. For further questions emailclinical.champions@diabetes.org.uk
  • Think, check, act, NHS Scotland Quality Improvement Hub website (2015)

    This project aims to increase the number of patients who are assessed within 24 hours of admission to hospital, reduce insulin errors and improve the management of hypoglycaemia.This project aims to increase the number of patients who are assessed within 24 hours of admission to hospital, reduce insulin errors and improve the management of hypoglycaemia.
  • DAWN: diabetes appointments via webcam in Newham, The British Journal of Diabetes website (2015)

    This article suggests that web-based appointments can be used as part of outpatient services to improve patient experience and provide better access to effective care, with the potential to improve longer-term efficiency. For more information about DAWN, visit the Health Foundation and Quality in Care websites. For guidance on using remote consultations, see the HSCIC's fact sheet.This article suggests that web-based appointments can be used as part of outpatient services to improve patient experience and provide better access to effective care, with the potential to improve longer-term efficiency. For more information about DAWN, visit theHealth Foundation and Quality in Carewebsites. For guidance on using remote consultations, see the HSCIC'sfact sheet.
  • Improving the quality of assessment and management of hypoglycaemia in hospitalised patients with diabetes by introducing 'hypo boxes' to general medical wards with a specialist interest in diabetes, BMJ Quality Improvement website (2015)

    This article shows how 'hypo boxes' can improve the assessment and management of episodes of hypoglycaemia in inpatients with diabetes.This article shows how 'hypo boxes' can improve the assessment and management of episodes of hypoglycaemia in inpatients with diabetes.
  • A seven day diabetes service for inpatients and the emergency department in an acute hospital setting, Future Hospital Journal website (2014)

    This case study describes how the East and North Herts Diabetes Outreach Team (DOT) introduced seven day a week access to diabetes specialists for inpatients. Learn more about the seven day service.This case study describes how the East and North Herts Diabetes Outreach Team (DOT) introduced seven day a week access to diabetes specialists for inpatients. Learn more about the seven day service.
  • "My diabetes, my insulin": self-administration of insulin in hospital, The Journal of Diabetes Nursing website (2014)

    This article describes a cascade training programme in Aintree University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust that enables ward-based nurses to assess their patients’ ability to administer their own insulin and support self management.This article describes a cascade training programme in Aintree University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust that enables ward-based nurses to assess their patients’ ability to administer their own insulin and support self management.

Resources

E-learning

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