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Take part in diabetes research

Diabetes research would not be possible without the support of people with diabetes. You can play a vital role by taking part in a research study or trial.

Diabetes researchers at King's College

Why we need clinical trials

Before new treatments can be used to help people with diabetes, they must be carefully tested to determine their safety and effectiveness. Clinical trials rely on volunteers to help them work out if treatments are safe, what the side effects are and whether they are more effective than existing treatments. By taking part in trials, you could play an important role in helping to prevent diabetes, to develop new and better treatments, or to find a potential cure.

Things to consider

If you would like to take part in a clinical trial you should always consult your healthcare team and speak to the healthcare professionals involved in the study.

You should be aware that there may be adverse side effects or disadvantages when participating in research or trials. Find out more about what it's like to take part in medical research by listening to those who have already done it at HealthTalkOnline.

UK Clinical Trials Gateway

If you would like to find clinical trials in which you might be able to take part, the UK Clinical Trials Gateway can help. They offer guidance on how trials work and can connect you to researchers running trials that you might be interested in.

To find out what trials are currently underway for diabetes, please access the gateway here. We are keen to find out whether you found the gateway helpful, so please contact us on research@diabetes.org.uk with any feedback.

Diabetes research trial opportunities

We list current opportunities for getting involved here. The list is provided for information purposes only and should not be treated as advice or a recommendation for participation in any of the studies.

All clinical trials are reviewed to ensure they they are fair to participants and have the necessary ethical approval before advertising on this page.

Studies for people with Type 1 diabetes

The impact Type 1 diabetes has on education

Researchers at the University of Cambridge would like to recruit young people aged 16-25 with Type 1 diabetes to take part in a study that looks at the impact of their diabetes on education, social life and wellbeing. Taking part in the study involves completing a questionnaire, which should only take around 10 minutes.

For more information please contact Rosanna Fennessy at rtf21@cam.ac.uk.

Understanding diabetes and quality of life

Researchers at University of Sheffield would like people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes (aged 18-75) who live in the UK or Australia to take part in their study. They want to understand more about how diabetes affects quality of life and how best to measure this. 

For information, please contact Lizzie Coates at e.coates@sheffield.ac.uk or 0114 222 0886

The history of Type 1 diabetes treatment

Researchers at the University of Strathclyde are studying the history of Type 1 diabetes. They would like to recruit people with Type 1 diabetes and practitioners involved in the treatment (including those now retired) to take part in an interview. Participants will answer questions about their lives, their experiences with Type 1 diabetes, and their attitudes to medicine and health more generally. The research will examine the way insulin therapy changed from the mid-twentieth century as people with diabetes became more involved in making decisions about their condition.

For information please contact Stuart Bradwel.

Newly diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes?

Researchers at Imperial College London are looking for children and adults (aged 5 years or older) who have been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in the last six months to take part in a study. The study aims to form a picture of newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes in the modern and diverse UK population, and also helps to put people with Type 1 diabetes and their siblings in touch with researchers running other diabetes studies. For example, one such trial is testing whether a new treatment can preserve beta cells.

For more information, please contact Helen Walkey (Study Coordinator) at address2@imperial.ac.uk or 020 7594 1316, or go to www.address2.org.

Young people with Type 1 and self-care

Researchers at University of Brighton would like to recruit young people (18-25 years) diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at least 12 months ago to take part in a study looking at how ‘time perspective’ can influence self-care.

Time perspective is the extent to which we think about our past, present and future. We know that it may influence health choices we make, but we don’t know how what effect it may have on the self-management of Type 1 diabetes.

Taking part in the study involves answering an online questionnaire, which you can access through here.

For information please contact Elaine Sharp es136@brighton.ac.uk or call 01273 641918.

Omega-3 supplements in Type 1

Researchers at Leeds Beckett University would like to recruit adults with Type 1 diabetes to take part in a study investigating whether taking omega-3 supplements can improve blood glucose management around meal-times. They are looking for men and women aged between 18 and 65 years treated using insulin injections or insulin pump and who don’t have diabetes complications.

For more information please contact: Lauren O’Mahoney via Email: L.Omahoney@leedsbeckett.ac.uk  or phone 0113 8122059

Young people and long-term conditions

Researchers at the University of Bath would like to recruit 11-17 year olds with Type 1 diabetes to take part in a study aiming to improve our understanding about how young people view their long-term conditions. Taking part requires to fill in an online survey, which should only take 15-20 minutes. Participants aged 11-15 will need to gain their parents’ permission, which can be provided through the survey.

For information or to take part please visit the study page here.

You can also contact Cara Haines at C.Haines@bath.ac.uk for more information.

Studies for people with Type 2 diabetes

Experience of Type 2 diabetes and education courses

Researchers at the University of Surrey would like to recruit adults with Type 2 diabetes living in the UK to take part in a study. They want to understand the experience of living with Type 2 diabetes and your views about diabetes education courses (e.g. DESMOND, X-PERT) and want to talk to people who have and who haven’t taken part in a diabetes education course. Taking part in a study involves an interview, which can take place in person or over the phone.

For information please contact Eolie Hampson at e.hampson@surrey.ac.uk

Emotional impact of Type 2 diabetes

Researchers at The University of Hull would like to recruit adults with Type 2 diabetes to take part in a study. The researchers want to develop a better understanding what emotional impact Type 2 diabetes has. They want to learn from the experiences of those living with the condition, and look for ways to enhance support and improve health outcomes.

For information, please go to the study webpage.

For any questions, please contact the researcher at info.diabetesresearch@gmail.com

Lowering blood glucose in people with Type 2

Researchers at University College London Hospital and King’s College London would like to recruit people with Type 2 diabetes (taking at least one oral diabetes medication) to take part in their study. They want to find out if a new endoscopic procedure, called DMR, can lower blood glucose levels in people who have Type 2 diabetes.

For information, please contact Marcia Henderson-Wilson (King’s College site) on revita.trial@nhs.net or Dr Cormac Magee (University College London Hospital site) on cormac.magee@nhs.net.

High-intensity Interval Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers at Ulster University (Derry/Londonderry, Northern Ireland) would like to recruit men with Type 2 diabetes to take part in a study looking at the effects of a time-efficient high-intensity interval exercise session (which takes 10 minutes total) on 24-hour blood glucose levels. The study is using continuous glucose monitors to understand the effects of exercise on blood glucose levels when participants are outside of a lab environment (performing their normal daily activities). The team are looking for participants who are 18-60 years of age, with a BMI of less than 35, who take no more than two diabetes medications and are not on insulin therapy.

For more information, please contact Dr Richard Metcalfe on r.metcalfe@ulster.ac.uk or 028 716 75037.

Using apps to manage your diabetes?

Researchers at the University of Bristol would like to recruit adults with Type 2 diabetes, who are currently using or have previously used a web-based tool or app to help them manage their diabetes. The researchers are trying to understand people’s experiences, and what they do and don’t like about this technology. Participating in the study would involve an interview. The researchers are looking for people with different experiences and from different backgrounds to compare their views.

For information please contact Sophie Turnbull at sophie.turnbull@bristol.ac.uk, or call 0117 9287220.

Importance of exercise with a Type 2 family history

Researchers at the University of Liverpool would like to recruit people with a parent, sibling or child with Type 2 diabetes to take part in their study to understand the importance of physical activity in those with a family history of the condition. The study involves six visits to the clinic to have several health checks (like an MRI scan) and the team are looking for people aged 18-60 years who do over 10,000 steps per day.(Reimbursements for time and travel are available).

For more information, please contact Kelly Davies at kdavies@liverpool.ac.uk.

Are psychological factors linked to diabetes?

Researchers at University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia, are currently recruiting adults with Type 2 diabetes, at high risk of Type 2 diabetes, who have/had gestational diabetes or have no diabetes. They would like participants to complete a 15-20 minute anonymous online survey to help them to understand the relationships between psychological distress, impulsivity, body mass index (BMI) and food addiction in people with and without diabetes.

For more information, please contact Karren-Lee Raymond at Karren-lee.Raymond@research.usc.edu.au or go to the survey website.

Blood glucose control after meals

Researchers at Glasgow Caledonian University and Strathclyde University are investigating whether blood glucose control after meals could be improved in people with Type 2 diabetes, by breaking up periods of sitting with light walking. They’ll be using continuous glucose monitors to carry out their study, and are looking for people (aged 35 to 75 years) with Type 2 diabetes who use metformin or diet management in the Glasgow area. They hope their findings will help to develop better lifestyle support for people with Type 2 diabetes.

For information, please contact Aye Chan Paing at AyeChan.Paing@gcu.ac.uk.

Understanding how people use mobile apps for diabetes

Researchers at University of Sheffield would like to recruit people with Type 2 diabetes who are current or former users of mobile apps to monitor their diet and/or exercise. The researchers are interested in how people select apps, what features are useful, how apps are used, what people think about the information they get from the apps and whether they think there are any risks to using them. Taking part involves filling in a short survey, which can be found on the survey page.

For information please contact Pamela McKinney at p.mckinney@sheffield.ac.uk.

Studies for people with any type of diabetes

Social experience of living with diabetes

Researchers at The University of Surrey would like to recruit adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, who can use a computer and are UK citizens to take part in a study. Researchers want to understand more about the social experience of living with diabetes. Taking part in this research involves filling in an online survey.

The survey for people with Type 1 diabetes. 

The survey for people with Type 2 diabetes.

For information please contact Kimberley Smith at Kimberley.j.smith@surrey.ac.uk

Learning disabilities and diabetes

Researchers at the Open University would like to recruit adults, who have mild-to-moderate learning disabilities and Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes to take part in a study, looking at what people with learning disabilities think is good and bad about their diabetes appointments in primary care.

Where possible, researchers would also like to recruit one person who helps with appointments.

For information please contact Lorna Rouse at lorna.rouse@open.ac.uk or 07756099058

Attitudes towards medication

Researchers at University College Dublin would like to recruit adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes to take part in a study. They want to use a newly developed survey tool to better understand your attitudes towards the medication and medical technologies that make up your daily treatment regimen. They believe this research can help people with diabetes to add their voice to how treatments are developed and provided, and they think this is the only way to improve healthcare decision-making.

You can take part in a survey on Metformin (Glucophage) here.

For information please contact Daniel Regan at daniel.regan@ucd.ie

Understanding diabetes and quality of life

Researchers at University of Sheffield would like people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes (aged 18-75) who live in the UK or Australia to take part in their study. They want to understand more about how diabetes affects quality of life and how best to measure this. 

For information, please contact Lizzie Coates at e.coates@sheffield.ac.uk or 0114 222 0886

Decisions about having a family

Researchers at the University of Bath would like to recruit women with diabetes who are resident in the UK to take part in a study. They want to identify the main challenges they face (if any) around their treatment when making decisions about having a family, when pregnant or after childbirth. They are conducting a short 5-10 minute survey to hear about your experiences and ideas for future research in this area.

For information please contact: Dr Sarah Chapman on s.c.e.chapman@bath.ac.uk.

Pain in Neuropathy Study

A team at the University of Oxford would like to recruit people aged over 18 who have diabetes and neuropathy to a study of the causes of neuropathic pain. Their findings could inform the development of new therapies. (Recruiting until June 2017)

For information contact Dr Juan Ramirez on 07961620314 or juan.ramirez@ndcn.ox.ac.uk

How perceptions could improve self-management

Researchers at the University of Southampton would like to recruit people aged 18 or over, with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, to take part in a study examining how people with diabetes form impressions of both themselves and others. The study aims to improve our understanding of how people’s perceptions of themselves and those around them can impact on diabetes management and healthcare decisions. The results could improve guidance on how to support people with diabetes to self-manage their condition. 

For more information, please contact Clark West on cgw1g13@soton.ac.uk or 07792463525.

Have you experienced harassment online?

Researchers at the National Centre for Cyberstalking Research (NCCR) would like to speak to people aged 18 or older, living with any type of chronic condition and residing in the UK. They’re examining the impact of cyber victimisation (cyberharrasment, cyberstalking, cyber disability hate incidents) on people living with chronic conditions or disabilities. 

If you are interested in taking part, please go to the survey website or contact NCCR@beds.ac.uk for information.

Healthcare professionals and cyber victimisation

Researchers at the National Centre for Cyberstalking Research (NCCR) would like to recruit GPs in the UK to take part in a study, to examine their perceptions on the impact cyber victimisation (cyberharrasment, cyberstalking, cyber disability hate incidents) has on people living with chronic conditions or disabilities. 

If you are interested in taking part, fill this short survey or contact NCCR@beds.ac.uk for information. 

Studies for people at high risk of diabetes

Millet grain to help people at high risk of Type 2

Researchers at Oxford Brookes University would like to recruit people between the age of 18 and 65, with impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance (at high risk of Type 2 diabetes or diagnosed with prediabetes) to take part in a study. The researchers want to see if eating millet grain-based food could help people to keep their blood glucose levels under a better control. Participating in this study involves two visits to the Functional Food Centre at Oxford Brookes University, lasting around four hours each.

For information please contact Ameerah Almaski at ameerah.almaski-2015@brookes.ac.uk.

Diabetes UK accepts no responsibility for participation in any research or clinical trial and is therefore not liable for any claims (except in respect of death or personal injury caused by Diabetes UK’s negligence) that might arise during the course of research.

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