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Bariatric surgery and going into remission: Kieran's story

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Kieran

Diagnosed in 2016 at the age of 36

"I recall the reply I gave my consultant at my first post-op check-up when asked how I felt: “Liberated!”

Kieran lost six stone in the four months following weight loss surgery for type 2 diabetes and his diabetes is in remission.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in early 2016 at the age of 36. I put it down to the fact that I was morbidly obese. I also had other weight-related conditions, including hypertension (high blood pressure), fatty liver and sleep apnoea (stop-start breathing while asleep). My BMI at the time of my diabetes diagnosis was 38.9 and I weighed 21 stone. 

Treatments

Surgery

As a result, I was referred for bariatric surgery. I met with my consultant, who explained to me what the procedure entails and what would be expected of me both before and after surgery. He instantly made me feel relaxed and eased any concerns I had. I was required to lose three stone before the operation, which I did through strict diet. It helped prepare me for life after surgery.

In August 2017, I had a type of gastric bypass known as Roux-en-Y. This procedure involves creating a small pouch from the stomach and re-routing the intestines through this pouch, bypassing the rest of the stomach. I now eat less because I feel full sooner.

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Remission

Life after surgery

Immediately after surgery, my consultant told me to stop taking the metformin medication. I had regular check-ups every six months thereafter with the amazing team at Shrewsbury Hospital. My bariatric dietician has been incredible with the level of support and advice she has offered me. 

Within four months of having the surgery, I had lost a further six stone and now weighed 12 stone. My sleep apnoea had gone and my regular blood tests showed my blood sugar levels (and other factors) had returned to normal, meaning that my diabetes was no longer within the diagnostic levels.

More than two years since the surgery, I am sticking to eating healthy and following the strict guidelines set by the bariatric team. Admittedly, I do have a treat every now and then, but within strict moderation. To my surprise, I am still able to eat many of the foods I enjoyed prior to surgery, though I do avoid junk food and fast food at all costs. Also, I have not had alcohol or fizzy drinks since the operation. 

I recall the reply I gave my consultant at my first post-op check-up when asked how I felt: “Liberated!” I feel so much healthier and I can do so much more than I did before surgery.
 

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